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Sunday, June 3, 2012

#GBE2: "High" School

You know there's trouble when a school has an open lunch policy, a park next door, and a school full of spoiled rich kids with enough money to buy whatever they want. That was my 1970s high school.


Although I never partook in the afternoon escapes of my high school, I have vivid memories of the aftermath. Each day after lunch, I'd sit in English class and stare at the boy across the room. His handsome face was marred by bloodshot eyes and a faraway expression. He never spoke nor seemed to be a part of the class. Did the teacher not notice his drugged out appearance or did she just not care? It was scary to think someone could be that high in a high school class. It was even scarier to think of a good looking kid being so screwed up.


I know this is a humor blog, and I'm sure there is plenty to make fun of when it comes to high kids. I've included funny pictures because it's better than crying, but it just isn't funny to have recently attended TWO funerals for young men who over dosed. 

I attended "high" school without even a buzz. I survived, as did my stoned classmates, without any red ribbon weeks or "Just Say No" assemblies, so why are today's kids dying? Are the drugs containing dangerous fillers that my classmates didn't encounter? Is it a social class thing? Maybe my classmates bought purer drugs with their abundance of money. 

I know today's schools have a lot more control on kids than my school did. No open lunch policies and no smoking lounge for kids nor teachers. Is that the problem? Has too much restriction caused a youth rebellion? I don't know the answer to this. 



I'd say it's all about good parenting, but the parents mourning their kids are top notch! Seriously. These are wonderful parents who were there for the kids throughout.

I know this is not the direction Beth expected when she wrote "High School," but in lieu of what's been going on in my community it's what on my mind.



I can certainly tell the kids to "Just Say No," but I already did that. They didn't listen. So what now?


24 comments:

Lynn Proctor said...

this was the same situation way back when i was in high school--i am sorry for your losses and my heart goes out to their families<3

KAT said...

This is such a serious problem and heart-breaking. I don't know the answer either, but sure wish there was one.

Sandra Tyler said...

Good ppoint about whether parents are imposing too many restrictions or not; maybe that is different from the helipcopter parenting I encounter. Hard for me to judge, as I am not there yet with my young boys. I will get there and am sure will have the same questions. You linked this up with my workshop hop, though I don't think this was intended as a first person ficitional point of view?:) anyway, happy to have you.

Binky said...

Obviously it's a very big problem and will likely continue to be. The only thing that could really stop it is if no one really wanted to take drugs, which is probably very unlikely.

Suzy said...

This is such a serious and sad problem. I am so sorry for your loss.

Phoenixritu said...

I do think too much control is as bad as too little. It makes the kids rebellious and since they are so protected, they overdo things. Scary.

Precy Larkins said...

That's so sad. :( I don't have the answer. I wish I did.

Dieter Moitzi said...

I guess the problem's not only drugs or whether we're too permissive or not enough. Me too, how many kids do I encounter each and every morning, me on my way to work, they on their way to school, and they're already smoking weed or pot. Then there's the binge-drinking problem. I had my share of too much alcohol when I was a teenager; yet we drank one glass after the other, slowly, enjoying it & ourselves and sometimes – by accident – we just lost count & control, getting drunk without wanting to. Whereas today kids seem to have a single-minded goal, which is to get pissed as fast and as thoroughly as possible. Why? Did WE really think the future'd be ours, when today's kids have lost all those dreams we could have back then? Do they really feel so violently that today's society is unforgiving and cold? You sure did evoke a serious and complex problem here...

laila said...

Very sad indeed!The blame is actually on the adults who manufacture and produce these drugs and the middlemen who sell it to the youngsters.It's all about money with scant regard for the younger generation.

Kathy said...

That is so sad. I don't have the answers. My guess is those kids thought it was cool to get high right up until the moment they died. It is a pity they didn't value life a little more and realize that high school is just a moment in your life, just 4 short years. They could have lived so much longer, and experienced so much more. Instead they threw it away for a quick high to make them numb. Tragic.

Kathy
http://gigglingtruckerswife.blogspot.com

Mojo Writin said...

I think there will always be a drugs problem because there will always be a thrill in using something illegal, especially in the 'rebellious teens' phase. Legalising all drugs will take away that part of the problem. Having drugs freely, legally available will also bring down the price and thus less profit for drug lords and their crews. Yes, I know it's all a bit pie in the sky as I can't honestly see cocaine or crack ever being legalised, but I stand by my thought that this might be the way forward.

Joyce Lansky said...

I wonder, in Amsterdam where everything is legal, do kids die of drug over doses? How serious of a problem is this in a permissive society? I always believed that marijuana should be legal and taxed sky high. This would probably deter it more.

Joyce Lansky said...

It's sad indeed. Some of these kids are fighting inner demons and just want peace, while others have accidents.

Theresa said...

I don't think the blame is on the parents. My mom had 4 of us. There were never drugs in the home, and were taught that they were bad and to stay away from them. Yet, my 3 siblings all have drug issues (hard core, not just marijuana) and I have never touched a single drug in my life. I know it wasn't because of parenting or home issues they became addicts.

We all have free will to make our own choices, and teenagers are smart enough to know the dangers associated with taking drugs. I think they have an invincibility complex where they think the dangers don't apply to them though. It's scary and it's sad that so many of our youth decide to go down that path, yet as one poster said, there will always be the thrill of doing something illegal and getting away with it, and that is what is going to keep kids coming back for more.

Claudia Moser said...

Sorry ...

Susan ~ Today's Working Woman said...

I remember a day in Spanish class when the kid behind me was dealing dope...I couldn't believe it. I was scared out of my mind. It was awful...your post brought back that memory...I'm so sorry for you and for me.

Art of RetroCollage said...

This is a tragic scourge. & it won't be stopped until we all take responsibility for educating young people about the dangers of drug addiction & substance abuse, & cooperate with law enforcement personnel to end drug trafficking here & abroad.

Lucy said...

I wish I knew what the answer was. I know all too well that the high schools are filled with drugs. When I was in high school in the 80's I was terrified of drugs. Maybe the kids today have no fear? What's really sad is that when one of their classmates dies from an overdose they continue to use and abuse. The "it won't happen to me" syndrome.

Amy McMunn Schindler said...

I liked your take on this and the following comments. I'm sorry. It's sad. Kids make bad choices.

Word Nerd said...

My high school had an open campus policy as well as a smoking area for students, just outside the cafeteria. Drugs were definitely readily available, but of those who indulged, it was almost exclusively just pot.

I wish I had answers. Today's kids seem to be dying in far greater numbers than those of our generation. Overdoses. Suicides. Even fatal car crashes involving teens seem more commonplace now. It's terribly sad and very disturbing.

Lee Brooks said...

You can talk until your blue in the face. They will learn when they are darn good and ready. Hopefully it won't be too late.

Brenda Stevens said...

oh i teared up reading this ((hugs)) i so understand you

beachlover said...

Loved this blog and I love your message! Unfortunately, I think kids in pain discover the "escape" and numbing of drugs. I just wish drugs would disappear from the face of the earth!

Journey of Life said...

Yeah ... aside from drugs .. they are more problems even with good kids that chew up some kind of pill to gain good grade. The post about this will be on my blog tomorrow morning.